Diabetes Management: Evidence Based Practice Project

Topic: Endocrinology
Words: 1453 Pages: 5

Diabetes management is a crucial aspect of disease treatment, and nurses play an important role in providing patients will all the necessary knowledge regarding the issue. The PICO(T) question for the paper is “In United States’ adolescents with diabetes mellitus (P), how does the provision of DSMES by nurses (I) affect their knowledge (C) on diagnosis and compliance with the treatment methods (O)?” The number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes will rise from 22.3 million (9.1% of the population) in 2014 to 39.7 million (13%) in 2030 and 60.6 million (17%) in 2060 (Powers et al., 2020). Type 2 diabetes affects 90–95% of people with diabetes (Powers et al., 2020). Diabetes is a costly condition, and an individual with diabetes will spend 2.3 times as much on medical expenses for basic health care (Powers et al., 2020). Despite improvements in treatment methods for medication and technology since 2005, there has been no progress in achieving clinical aim goals. In fact, between 2010 and 2016, improvements in results stagnated or even reversed (Powers et al., 2020). Medical goals are not being met, which is confusing given the diabetes crisis.

Summary of Research Article

This quantitative research showed that in the delivery of DSMES, the role of nurses, including advanced nurse practitioners (APNs), is still unclear. The standard of treatment for people with DM urgently requires the deployment of an evidence-based DSEMS program. The article emphasized that the establishment of a nurse-led DSMES initiative has the potential to enhance patient knowledge and diabetic self-management abilities (Macido, 2019). It might enhance treatment adherence and possibly avoid frequent hospitalizations in adolescents with DM (Macido, 2019). The provision of DSEMS by nurses ought to be seen as the norm of treatment for patients with DM in all clinical settings, not only inpatient ones when it is feasible to do so.

Macido (2019) used an inpatient setting in a community hospital on the West coast to assess the impact of a DSMES program on adolescents’ awareness of DM. The author also used patient medication adherence using descriptive, pretest-posttest research using convenience sampling (Macido, 2019).

The first finding of the study is that DSMES is a somewhat inexpensive instrument that can be utilized in healthcare facilities where DM sufferers seek medical assistance is the DSMES. It is comparatively simpler to train nurses to provide DSMES. Delivering DSMES is simple because it does not call for the use of any elaborate teaching aids or technology and takes only a small amount of time. The administration of DSMES by nurses to patients with DM can readily be incorporated into standard care (Macido, 2019). The standard of treatment for DM adolescents ought to be DSMES provided by nurses.

Major Variables

There are some major variables in the research, with conceptual and operational definitions for each. Diabetes education is a two-level categorical variable, and that is also the independent variable (Macido, 2019). It identifies the level of knowledge regarding the issue before and after the implication of DSMES and is measured by evaluating the number of knowledge participants have in both stages (Macido, 2019). Medication adherence and patient awareness of DM are the dependent variables (Macido, 2019). Scalar factors include adolescents’ understanding of DM as judged by the diabetes knowledge tests and medication adherence as measured by the Medication Adherence Questionnaire.

Strengths and Weaknesses

The amount of time available to conduct the investigation was one of the research study’s limitations. Because there was comparatively less time for the investigation, fewer individuals were able to be recruited within the allotted time. A problem with the study’s results’ believability was its limited sample size (Macido, 2019). No capacity analysis was performed to determine the minimum participation requirement necessary to guarantee that the outcomes of the project can be generalized. Another restriction on the research was the use of convenience sampling.

When compared to random sampling, convenience samples frequently have a lower degree of generalizability. The fact that this project’s participants could only read, write, communicate, and understand English is another limitation (Macido, 2019). However, there is also certain strength regarding this specific study. With the use of established data gathering techniques, quantitative approaches are thought to yield more precise and objective results, and as a result, quantitative research has the ability to be duplicated.

Practice Guideline

Grunberger, G., Sherr, J., Allende, M., Blevins, T., Bode, B., Handelsman, Y.,… & Unger, J. (2021). American Association of Clinical Endocrinology clinical practice guideline: the use of advanced technology in the management of persons with diabetes mellitus. Endocrine Practice, 27(6), 505-537. Web.

Modern diabetes technology can help people with diabetes manage their condition more efficiently and safely, enhance their quality of life, make their lives more convenient, and possibly lighten their caregiver load. Technology for diabetes can also increase clinical decision-effectiveness makings and efficiency (Grunberger et al., 2021). Understanding the operation of equipment in this quickly evolving industry is necessary for the successful incorporation of these innovations into healthcare.

With the help of this knowledge, medical professionals will be able to give adolescents who are receiving these therapies the education and training they need. They will also be better equipped to evaluate data and change patient care as necessary (Grunberger et al., 2021). All people with diabetes have the potential to benefit from modern diabetic technology. However, as it stands, technology does not offer a fix; rather, it offers a better understanding of problems and improved tools to solve them (Grunberger et al., 2021). It will be easier for people with diabetes and physicians to examine data in real-time and retrospectively review it if data gathered from diabetic devices is made freely available (Grunberger et al., 2021). The use of artificial intelligence to aid in the analysis of glycemic data and essential insulin dose recommendations is being researched by a number of device makers.

Fourth Resource

Improved diabetes outcomes may result from formal quality improvement measures. The DSMES must adapt to new information, therapeutic approaches, instructional approaches, psychosocial interventions, consumer trends, and the evolving landscape of health care (Beck et al., 2017). Providers of DSMES can pinpoint areas for improvement and modify participant engagement tactics and service offerings by continuously assessing and tracking both processes and results from data. Evaluation can help ensure that the service is maintained. Clinical advancement and long-term, beneficial health effects are significantly influenced by efficient DSMES.

Identifying requirements and disseminating knowledge and abilities that support efficient coping and self-management requires a customized and all-encompassing strategy. The DSMES provider(s) will use behavior modification goal-setting techniques to assist participants in reaching their individual objectives (Beck et al., 2017). Although initial DSMES is required, people cannot maintain lifetime diabetic self-management with just this. After six months, initial gains in metabolism and other results have been observed to wane. Individuals need continuing diabetes self-management help to keep their behavior at the level required to effectively self-manage their diabetes. Resources that assist a person in putting into practice and maintaining the continuing skills, knowledge, and behavioral adjustments required to manage their disease are referred to as ongoing support (Beck et al., 2017). The choice of the material or action that best meets the participant’s needs for self-management is crucial.

Conclusion

The initial PICO question was: How does the provision of DSMES by nurses affect adolescents with diabetes mellitus in the United States in terms of their understanding of diagnosis and adherence to treatment regimens? During the research, I learned that diabetes is a costly condition, and an individual who has diabetes will spend 2.3 times as much on medical expenses for their basic health care (Powers et al., 2020). The standard of treatment for people with DM urgently requires the deployment of an evidence-based DSEMS program. Delivering DSMES is simple because it does not call for the use of elaborate teaching aids or technology and takes only a small amount of time (Grunberger et al., 2021). The DSMES must adapt to new information, therapeutic approaches, instructional approaches, psychosocial interventions, consumer trends, and the evolving landscape of health care (Macido, 2019). The DSMES provider can pinpoint areas for improvement and modify participant engagement tactics and service offerings by continuously assessing and tracking both processes and results data (Beck et al., 2017). Understanding the operation of equipment in this quickly evolving industry is necessary for the successful incorporation of these innovations into healthcare.

All nurses must play a critical role in patient education, especially when they are adolescents. The delivery of DSMES by nursing may enhance the results of DM people. The majority of people with DM or symptoms regrettably do not obtain adequate DSMES services. The results of care can be enhanced by nurses caring for hospitalized people who have diabetes and having a greater understanding of evidence-based techniques like DSMES.

References

Macido, A. (2019). A Nurse-Led Inpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support Program to Improve Patient Knowledge and Treatment Adherence. Journal of Health Education Teaching, 10(1), 1–10.

Powers, M. A., Bardsley, J. K., Cypress, M., Funnell, M. M., Harms, D., Hess-Fischl, A.,… & Uelmen, S. (2020). Diabetes self-management education and support in adults with type 2 diabetes: a consensus report of the American Diabetes Association, the Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of PAs, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, and the American Pharmacists Association. Diabetes Care, 43(7), 1636-1649. Web.

Grunberger, G., Sherr, J., Allende, M., Blevins, T., Bode, B., Handelsman, Y.,… & Unger, J. (2021). American Association of Clinical Endocrinology clinical practice guideline: the use of advanced technology in the management of persons with diabetes mellitus. Endocrine Practice, 27(6), 505-537. Web.

Beck, J., Greenwood, D. A., Blanton, L., Bollinger, S. T., Butcher, M. K., Condon, J. E.,… & Wang, J. (2017). 2017 National standards for diabetes self-management education and support. Diabetes care, 40(10), 1409-1419. Web.

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